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To grasp precisely how Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) works, you'll need to be aware of the role that platelets engage in healing. Platelets are a component of blood, including red and white blood cells. When a person gets a wound, the platelets are one of your body's first responses that come to a stop the bleeding and promote healing.

Researchers speculated that if they could obtain concentrated platelets and inject them into damaged areas of the body, they could accelerate healing. It's possible.

How Is It Made?

To produce PRP, a medical expert will draw a blood sample and place it into a device called a centrifuge. This device revolves at a fast rate, which separates the elements of the blood. The medical expert then extracts the platelets for injection.

Effects On Hair

Physicians have also used PRP to treat injuries to the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, and it's results are impressive, however, what does PRP do for hair loss? PRP holds a range of growth factors and proteins that promote tissue repair. Due to this, hair loss that results from damage to hair follicles could be helped by PRP to regrow hair.

Due to this reversal, PRP has become a popular method of restoring hair growth. PRP science is still out there, but the effects are apparent, it has impressive growth factors inside. 

Is PRP Effective For Hair Regrow?

There are loads of studies that back up the effectiveness of PRP for regrowing hair.

A team of researchers carried out a methodical examination of the research on PRP as a treatment for hair loss. Their conclusions appear in Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. The study focused on 11 research papers that involved a total of 262 participants who had androgenetic alopecia. Evidently, most of the studies found that doses of PRP reduced hair loss and enlarged the diameter of hairs and the area of hair growth.

In Dermatologic Surgery, they investigated the findings of 19 studies that focused on PRP as a treatment for hair loss. These studies recruited 460 people in total. According to the creators of the review, most studies proclaimed that PRP procedures led to hair regrowth.

Treatment seems to work for many people. However, it isn't the be-all-end-all for hair loss. Regardless, people who experience hair loss are willing to try what it takes to regrow their hair, so if it's possible for a majority, then people will try it. Some people will want an alternative.

Is there an alternative to PRP?

Yes. Our Pep Factor is created from the start with the purpose of magnifying Fibroblast. We want our kit to provide the maximum amount of benefits for what our clients need. FGF is responsible for the regeneration of tissue, including skin and hair follicles. UMA's research laboratory has designed this unique formula. FGF also directs a range of multiple biological functions, including cellular proliferation, durability migration. 

What Is The Procedure For PRP Hair Loss

PRP injections are as follows:

  1. A medical professional draws blood 
  2. the blood sample is placed in a centrifuge.
  3. A centrifuge spins the blood, segregating its components.
  4. The professional medical extracts the platelets 
  5. The expert then injects the platelets into areas of the scalp.

The whole process may take approximately 1 hour, and several sessions may be required. After receiving PRP treatment, a person can generally return to their regular activities without any limitations.

How Long Do The Effects of PRP Last?

PRP does not cure conditions that produce hair loss. Due to this, a person would need to receive recurring PRP treatments overtime to support hair growth results. Regardless, patients have to take medications frequently that doctors commonly use to treat androgenetic alopecia. PRP is an ever-evolving technology as well, so things may improve in time. 

Injection frequency depends on the patient and how well they are receiving PRP treatments. The doctor may suggest having maintenance injections every 3–6 months once hair loss is under control.

The Hamilton-Norwood scale (sometimes only referred to as "Norwood scale") is the primary classification system used in the medical field to gauge the degree of male pattern baldness. This measurement scale was first introduced by James Hamilton in the 1950s and later revised and updated by O'Tar Norwood in the 1970s.

Men tend to lose their hair in a few common patterns over the development of many decades. The Hamilton-Norwood scale provides quick reference images that show distinct stages of balding. This is important for doctors to classify the stage of balding.

There are many other classification scales used by doctors, researchers, and hair transplant surgeons. Different classification scales include male and female, or only female, but Hamilton-Norwood is typically used by practitioners when discussing male pattern baldness.

It presents a reference point to diagnose the degree of baldness, consider treatment options, and measure the effectiveness of any treatment.

The Seven Stages of Hamilton-Norwood

The Hamilton-Norwood scale has seven steps. Each step marks the severity and pattern of hair loss.

Stage 1. There is a lack of bilateral recessions along the anterior border of the hairline in the frontoparietal regions. No notable hair loss or recession of the hairline.

Stage 2. There is a small recession of the hairline around the temples. Hair is also lost, or sparse, along the midfrontal border of the scalp, but the depth of the affected area is much less than in the frontoparietal regions. This is commonly referred to as an adult or mature hairline.

Stage 3. The first signs of significant balding appear. There is a deep, symmetrical recession at the temples that are only sparsely covered by hair.

Stage 3 vertex. The hairline stays at stage 2, although there is notable hair loss on the crown of the scalp (the vertex).

Stage 4. The hairline recession is harsher than in stage 2, and there is scattered hair or no hair on the vertex. There are deep frontotemporal recessions, usually symmetrical, and are either bare or very sparsely covered by hair.

Stage 5. The areas of hair loss are more significant than in stage 4. They are still divided, but the band of hair between them is thinner and sparser.

Stage 6. The connection of hair that crosses the crown is gone with only sparse hair remaining. The frontotemporal and vertex regions are joined together, and the extent of hair loss is more significant.

Stage 7. The most drastic stage of hair loss, only a band of hair, going around the sides of the head persists. This hair usually is not thick and might be dainty.

Norwood class A. This is a somewhat different and less common classification of hair loss. Norwood also defined a Type A variant from his standard classification system, which is distinguished by two major features and two minor features.

Major features

1) the border of the hairline grows to the rear without leaving an island of hair in the mid-frontal region

2) there is no synchronous development of a bald area on the vertex. Rather, the frontal hairline recession keeps progressing to the rear of the scalp.

Minor features

1) there is sparse hair scattering in the area of hair loss  

2) the horseshoe-shaped areas of hair that continue on the side and back of the scalp tend to be more extensive and touch higher on the head.

How is male pattern baldness diagnosed?

Common male pattern baldness is usually diagnosed based on the form and pattern of hair loss, along with a comprehensive medical history, including questions about the predominance of hair loss in your family.

How is hair loss treated?

Hair loss treatments are most potent when started early. It's more manageable to slow down hair loss than it is to incite new hair growth. Hair follicles that stop creating hair become dormant after about two years and can't be reactivated. However, there are ways to rejuvenate your hair follicles and start-up hair growth, such as Laser Hair Growth Helmets, and Pep Factor.

Laser Hair Growth Helmets. Low-level laser therapy is known as red light therapy and cold laser therapy, highlights, and empowers photons in the scalp tissues. These photons get absorbed by weak cells, which then encourages hair growth. At FACE, we use this type of treatment in our Laser Hair Growth Helmets.

Pep Factor. This serum is designed from the first drop with the intention of magnifying Fibroblast. Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGF) directs a range of various biological functions, including cellular proliferation, durability migration. FGF is also responsible for the renewal of tissue, including skin and hair follicles. UMA's research laboratory has designed this unique formula. 

Androgenetic alopecia (male or female patterned baldness) is a prevalent form of hair loss in both men and women. Hair is lost in a clear pattern, starting above both temples. As time passes, the hairline shrinks to form an infamous "M" shape. Hair also thins at the top, often advancing to partial or total baldness.

The pattern of hair loss found in women is different from male-pattern baldness. For women, the hair becomes thinner all over the head, and the hairline does not shrink. Androgenetic alopecia in women seldom leads to total baldness.

How Common Is Androgenetic Alopecia?

Androgenetic alopecia is a widespread cause of hair loss in both men and women. This kind of hair loss afflicts approximately 50 million men and 30 million women in the United States. Androgenetic alopecia can start as quick as a person's teens and the risk rises with age; more than 50 percent of men beyond the age of 50 have some stage of hair loss. In women, hair loss is most apparent after menopause.

What Causes Androgenetic Alopecia?

A variety of hereditary and environmental circumstances represent a part in inducing androgenetic alopecia. Although researchers are examining risk factors that may add to this condition, most of these factors remain hidden. Researchers have discovered that this kind of hair loss is linked to hormones called androgens, especially an androgen called dihydrotestosterone. Androgens are essential for normal male sexual maturation before birth and during puberty. Androgens also have other vital roles in both males and females, such as managing hair growth and sex drive.

Hair growth starts beneath the skin in structures called follicles. Each strand of hair grows typically for 2 to 6 years, goes into a resting phase for some months, and then falls out. The sequence starts over when the follicle begins growing a new hair. A spike in the levels of androgens in hair follicles can cause a shorter cycle of hair growth and produce shorter, more delicate strands of hair. Unfortunately, this also creates a delay in the growth of new hair to replace strands that are shed.

Two Ways Reverse Androgenetic Alopecia

Laser Hair Growth Helmets. Low-level laser therapy is known as red light therapy and cold laser therapy, highlights, and empowers photons in the scalp tissues. These photons get absorbed by weak cells, which then encourages hair growth. At FACE, we use this type of treatment in our Laser Hair Growth Helmets.

Laser helmets are indispensable in treating hair loss, but not all lasers are produced equal. FACE's product has 272 diode lasers that are developed especially for high-efficiency lasers that allow releasing the most significant volume of light and coverage for the total scalp area. The lasers are precisely crafted to encourage supreme hair growth. Laser Helmet lasers are known to reverse the thinning of follicles. Follicles will then ultimately return to their healthy natural state after being exposed to our specific lasers. 

Pep Factor. This serum is designed from the first drop with the intention of magnifying Fibroblast. Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGF) directs a range of various biological functions, including cellular proliferation, durability migration. FGF is also responsible for the renewal of tissue, including skin and hair follicles. UMA's research laboratory has designed this unique formula. 

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