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Platelets, the fundamental element of primary hemostasis, are also known to be reservoirs for many growth factors (GFs), which they store in their α-granules. Platelet aggregation and activation, after vascular damage, results in the release of several GFs that may affect the chemotaxis, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or other committed cells during the process of tissue repair and healing. 

The GFs released from platelets include platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs), changing growth factor-beta (TGF-β), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs).

What Do The Studies Say About PRP?

To explore the possibility that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could provide an autologous source of these essential GFs that benefit bone and soft tissue healing, many clinical and experimental studies dealing with the effects of PRP have been conducted. However, the benefit of PRP on bone formation is a controversial subject. While a report suggested a stimulatory impact with the addition of PRP, others have observed no improvement or have detected even inhibitory effects. 

Although the lack of standardization in application across these studies, including differences in the preparation method or dosage of PRP, biomaterials, species, implantation sites, and cell types, may have contributed to the inconsistent results, its hypothesized that the differences in GF composition among PRPs could lead to this discrepancy. 

How Does PRP Effect Growth Factors?

 Findings indicated that PRP induced proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of 10% PRP to the culture medium produced marked cell proliferation in vitro; this result was congruent with the findings of previous studies. Because higher concentration (30%) of PRP did not promote proliferation, as compared to controls, 10% PRP may be optimal for the experimental ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs).

Few studies have suggested the presence of negative regulators in PRP, such as thrombospondin, but the reason for the antiproliferative effect of high-concentration-PRP is not apparent. 

In a study, PRP suppressed the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Some studies have reported similar results in that PRP increased migration and proliferation, but reduced the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived MSCs in vitro. 

However, in this study, activated platelet-poor plasma (aPPP) did not suppress ALP activity at any concentration; therefore, these inhibitory effects may be associated with substances that are derived from platelets.

What Are The Results Of Pep Factor?

Pep Factor has consistent results among clients and has provided many people with youthful skin as well as renewed growth of hair. Researchers have made several innovations in molecular medicine and valuable ingredients for their delivery systems. Researchers are also researching more useful, cost-effective, and easy methods for skin and scalp cosmetics.

Our Pep Factor is created from the start with the purpose of magnifying Fibroblast. We want our kit to provide the maximum amount of benefits for what our clients need. FGF is responsible for the regeneration of tissue, including skin and hair follicles. UMA's research laboratory has designed this unique formula. FGF also directs a range of multiple biological functions, including cellular proliferation, durability migration. 

The Hamilton-Norwood scale (sometimes only referred to as "Norwood scale") is the primary classification system used in the medical field to gauge the degree of male pattern baldness. This measurement scale was first introduced by James Hamilton in the 1950s and later revised and updated by O'Tar Norwood in the 1970s.

Men tend to lose their hair in a few common patterns over the development of many decades. The Hamilton-Norwood scale provides quick reference images that show distinct stages of balding. This is important for doctors to classify the stage of balding.

There are many other classification scales used by doctors, researchers, and hair transplant surgeons. Different classification scales include male and female, or only female, but Hamilton-Norwood is typically used by practitioners when discussing male pattern baldness.

It presents a reference point to diagnose the degree of baldness, consider treatment options, and measure the effectiveness of any treatment.

The Seven Stages of Hamilton-Norwood

The Hamilton-Norwood scale has seven steps. Each step marks the severity and pattern of hair loss.

Stage 1. There is a lack of bilateral recessions along the anterior border of the hairline in the frontoparietal regions. No notable hair loss or recession of the hairline.

Stage 2. There is a small recession of the hairline around the temples. Hair is also lost, or sparse, along the midfrontal border of the scalp, but the depth of the affected area is much less than in the frontoparietal regions. This is commonly referred to as an adult or mature hairline.

Stage 3. The first signs of significant balding appear. There is a deep, symmetrical recession at the temples that are only sparsely covered by hair.

Stage 3 vertex. The hairline stays at stage 2, although there is notable hair loss on the crown of the scalp (the vertex).

Stage 4. The hairline recession is harsher than in stage 2, and there is scattered hair or no hair on the vertex. There are deep frontotemporal recessions, usually symmetrical, and are either bare or very sparsely covered by hair.

Stage 5. The areas of hair loss are more significant than in stage 4. They are still divided, but the band of hair between them is thinner and sparser.

Stage 6. The connection of hair that crosses the crown is gone with only sparse hair remaining. The frontotemporal and vertex regions are joined together, and the extent of hair loss is more significant.

Stage 7. The most drastic stage of hair loss, only a band of hair, going around the sides of the head persists. This hair usually is not thick and might be dainty.

Norwood class A. This is a somewhat different and less common classification of hair loss. Norwood also defined a Type A variant from his standard classification system, which is distinguished by two major features and two minor features.

Major features

1) the border of the hairline grows to the rear without leaving an island of hair in the mid-frontal region

2) there is no synchronous development of a bald area on the vertex. Rather, the frontal hairline recession keeps progressing to the rear of the scalp.

Minor features

1) there is sparse hair scattering in the area of hair loss  

2) the horseshoe-shaped areas of hair that continue on the side and back of the scalp tend to be more extensive and touch higher on the head.

How is male pattern baldness diagnosed?

Common male pattern baldness is usually diagnosed based on the form and pattern of hair loss, along with a comprehensive medical history, including questions about the predominance of hair loss in your family.

How is hair loss treated?

Hair loss treatments are most potent when started early. It's more manageable to slow down hair loss than it is to incite new hair growth. Hair follicles that stop creating hair become dormant after about two years and can't be reactivated. However, there are ways to rejuvenate your hair follicles and start-up hair growth, such as Laser Hair Growth Helmets, and Pep Factor.

Laser Hair Growth Helmets. Low-level laser therapy is known as red light therapy and cold laser therapy, highlights, and empowers photons in the scalp tissues. These photons get absorbed by weak cells, which then encourages hair growth. At FACE, we use this type of treatment in our Laser Hair Growth Helmets.

Pep Factor. This serum is designed from the first drop with the intention of magnifying Fibroblast. Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGF) directs a range of various biological functions, including cellular proliferation, durability migration. FGF is also responsible for the renewal of tissue, including skin and hair follicles. UMA's research laboratory has designed this unique formula. 

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